Mapping Francis Younghusband in the Gobi Desert, 1887, Part 4: from the Ya-hu oasis to Hami.

[Back to Part 3: from the Hun-kua-ling sandhills to the Ya-hu oasis]

From Ya-Hu to Hami, we can see that Younghusband now has to turn south, as his own map shows.

The journey takes from June 23rd to July 4th, or twelve days. His mapmaker places Ula Khutun almost halfway from Ya-hu to Hami, but I think this is likely wrong, as Younghusband tells us he arrives in Ula Khutun only two days after reaching Ya-hu.

On June 25 we reached Ula-khutun, where the road to Hami leaves the road to Guchen. It is merely a camping-ground, situated in a stony plain, surrounded by low mounds or heaps of gravel, at the southern base of a branch from the main range of the Altai Mountains, from which it is separated by a gravelly plain about twenty miles in width—the extension westward of the same plain in which Ya-hu is situated. The height of this southern ridge must be considerable, for a heavy snowstorm was falling on it even so late in the year as this (June 25), and the snow seemed to remain there.

(p. 111)

After Ula Khutun, Younghusband reports one more day of travel through “low hills” before they begin the arduous crossing of the “desert of Zungaria” on the 27th. For these reasons (plus the fact that Younghusband says Ula Khutun is in a westward extension of the same plain as Ya-hu is in) I think it makes sense to provisionally place Ula Khutun as shown below. The only additional evidence for this (there is nothing on any map I have found that contains anything remotely like the word “Khutun”) is that what I have shown as the route to Guchen is also the present day road.

Younghusband gives no indication of what route he took from Ya-hu to Ula Khutun, so that must be regarded as hypothetical as well.

On the days of June 27–29, Younghusband gives us an uncharacteristically long paragraph describing crossing the desert of Zungaria. I have added emphasis to certain phrases within the quote to highlight the important landmarks.

Our next march, however, was the most trying of all, for we had to cross the branch of the Gobi which is called the desert of Zungaria, one of the most absolutely sterile parts of the whole Gobi. We started at eleven in the morning, passing at first through the low hills, which were perfectly barren, but the hollows had a few tufts of bushes, and one hollow was filled with white roses. After seven and a half miles we left the hills, and entered a gravel plain covered with coarse bushes, but no grass. There was no path, and we headed straight for the end of the Tian-shan range. After passing over the plain for fifteen miles, we struck a path and followed it along till 1.3o p.m., when we halted to cook some food and rest the camels. It was of no use pitching camp, for there was neither water, fuel, nor grass ; not a bush, nor a plant, nor a blade of grass—absolutely nothing but gravel. I lay down on the ground and slept till Liu-san brought me some soup and tinned beef. We started again [June 28th] at 4 a.m., and marched till 3.15 p.m. through the most desolate country I have ever seen. Nothing we have passed hitherto can compare with it —a succession of gravel ranges without any sign of life, animal or vegetable, and not a drop of water. We were gradually descending to a very low level, the sun was getting higher and higher, and the wind hotter and hotter, until I shrank from it as from the blast of a furnace. Only the hot winds of the Punjab can be likened to it. Fortunately we still had some water in the casks, brought from our last camping-ground, and we had some bread, so we were not on our last legs; but it was a trying enough march for the men, and much more so for the camels, for they had nothing to eat or drink, and the heat both days was extreme. We at last reached a well among some trees. The guide called the distance two hundred and thirty li, and I reckon it at about seventy miles. We were twenty-seven hours and three-quarters from camp, including the halt of four and a half hours. We had descended nearly four thousand feet, and the heat down here was very much greater than we had yet experienced. We were encamped on the dry bed of a river, on the skirts of what looked like a regular park—the country being covered with trees, and the ground with long coarse grass. It was most striking, as on the other bank of the river there was not a vestige of vegetation.

(pp. 113-114)

Although the region of Dzungaria (Younghusband’s “Zungaria”) is 350 miles to the northwest, Soviet topographic maps agree in calling the arid basin between the Altai mountains and the extreme east end of the Tian Shan the the “Dzungarian Gobi” (Джунгарская гоби).

“Gobi,” is discussed by Owen Lattimore in a 1973 article as the Mongolian term for “a land of thin herbage, more suitable for camels than for cows, but capable also, if herds are kept small and moved frequently, of sustaining horses, sheep, and goats.” However Younghusband’s repeated emphasis on the barrenness of the area (“absolutely sterile,” “the most desolate country I have ever seen,” “neither water, fuel, nor grass; not a bush, nor a plant, nor a blade of grass—absolutely nothing but gravel”) indicates what a formidable crossing this is. The DEM shows it as essentially a big hole, with the very eastern end of the Tian Shan on the south side.

Incidentally, one doesn’t usually find the mountains adjacent to Hami labelled as being part of the Tian Shan. The Tian Shan (sometimes written Tien Shan) are a major range of central Asia, but the name is usually found running just from Kyrgyzstan (on the west end) to the Turfan Depression (on the east end).

However, occasionally you do find a map extending the Tian Shan all the way to Hami, which is clearly how Younghusband sees it.

Now, we don’t know exactly where the party entered the Dzungarian Gobi, but we do know that after fifteen miles of heading “straight for the end of the Tian-shan range” they struck a path, which then presumably led them in a less straight line to the next landmark: a well, among trees, 4000 feet lower (1200 metres) than where they started. It is now the afternoon of June 28th.

It’s a fair bet that the elevation of the place they left the hills on the 27th was close to 1500 metres elevation, as shown by the map below. The lowest area in the Dzungarian Gobi is at about 400 metres, so this roughly agrees with Younghusband’s “We had descended nearly four thousand feet.”

Today there is a settlement in the bottom of this arid depression named Naomaohu. In satellite imagery it really jumps out in this desert because of its green fields, which presumably rely on extensive irrigation from pumped groundwater. Yet outside of town, here in the bottom of the basin there are not only scattered trees occurring naturally, but also, Google tells us, the “Yiwu Naomaohu Populus Forest Ecological Garden Scenic Area (伊吾淖毛湖胡杨林生态园景区).” Populus is the genus of cottonwoods and aspen, and the special designation as a scenic area suggests that trees are, well, special in this area.

But, to be fair, the extent of trees in this bottomland goes on for some distance, so we can’t know exactly where the party spent the night of the 28th.

From here, on June 29th, they begin to ascend and pass by a remarkable house.

…we had to start at 1:30 in the afternoon, and march till three the next morning.

For nearly two miles we passed through a country well covered with trees, and patches of coarse grass and bushes. The soil was partly clay and partly sand. This ended as suddenly as it had begun, and we passed over the gravel desert again, where there was no vestige of grass or scrub. The hot wind blowing off this seemed absolutely to scorch one up; but yesterday’s order of things were now reversed—we were ascending while the sun was descending, and it gradually became cooler. About ten at night we suddenly found ourselves going over turf, with bushes and trees on either side, and a shrill clear voice hailed us from the distance. We halted, and the guide answered, and the stranger came up and turned out to be a Turki woman, who led us through the bushes over some cultivated ground to a house, the first I had seen for nearly a thousand miles… Flowing by the house was a little stream of the most delicious water. It was scarcely a yard broad, but it was not a mere trickle like the others we had passed in the Gobi, but was flowing rapidly, with a delightful gurgling noise, and was deep enough for me to scoop up water between my two hands.

(p. 116)

This water occurs only here, however, and it is two more hours across gravel to a distinctive gorge.

…hardly fifty yards from the stream the vegetation disappeared, and we were again on gravel desert, and we had still to travel for five hours, gradually ascending as before—at twelve passing through a gorge two and a half miles long, in a range of little hills running parallel to the slope. We halted as the day was dawning, on a part of the slope where there was enough scrub for fuel and for the animals to eat. No water.

(pp. 116-117)

At dawn on June 30th they are about three hours beyond the gorge.

There’s only one “gorge two and a half miles long, in a range of little hills running parallel to the slope.” Today the the road from Naomaohu to Hami goes through it.

The house with the trickling stream that they encountered two hours before the gorge should be, given their typical rate of travel, about four miles before it. There are several candidates of small, isolated areas with intense vegetation growth in the middle of the gravel plain that leads up towards the gorge. These can be seen on images taken by the Sentinel-2 satellite, using its “NDVI” band combination, which causes vegetation to jump out as green.

The leftmost site appears to be irrigated by a ditch coming from the gorge, so it perhaps did not exist in 1887. The centre and rightmost sites both have many trees and are equally good candidates. The dotted red line indicates possible travel from the present-day site of Naomaohu, but Younghusband’s party could easily have crossed the bottom of the depression further east, putting these sites on a line with the mouth of the gorge.

On June 30th they continue to somewhere called Morgai.

Next day we continued to ascend the long lower slopes of the Tian-shan, gradually rounding the eastern extremity of these mountains. We passed a cart-track leading from Barkul to Hami, which makes this detour round the Tian-shan to avoid crossing them. The going was bad on account of the stones, and because the whole slope was cut up by dry watercourses. These were seldom more than a foot deep, but the slope was covered with them. They were formed by the natural drainage from the mountains, which, instead of running in deep valleys, spreads over the slope. The whole country was still barren, being covered with scrub only; but in the depression at the foot of the slope was a small Turki village, surrounded with trees and cultivation.

That night we encamped near a Turki house called Morgai, surrounded with fields of wheat and rice, watered from a small stream which appeared above the surface just here, and which, lower down, spread out and was swallowed in the pebbly slopes of the mountain.

(p. 117)

The pass that they will cross the next day to Ching-cheng is fairly obvious (again, a road runs through it today), so we can feel pretty confident that on this day they work their way southeast and across the slope to the northern end of the pass. They would not gain much elevation as they traverse to the top of the debris fan issuing from the mountains.

Google Hybrid shows a small settlement bearing the Chinese name of Shangmaya at this site, but the Soviet 1:500,000 scale map from 1985 (K-46-2) shows “разв. Могой [razv. Mogoi], meaning “the развалины [razvaliny]” i.e., ruins “of Mogoi.” This, I think we can feel fairly confident, is Morgai.

The next day, July 1st, they cross the east end of the Tian-shan.

Starting early, we ascended the stream, but it soon disappeared again, and we saw nothing more of it. The hillsides were at first rather bare, but the higher we got the greener they became; and after five or six miles were covered with rich green turf, most delightful to look upon after the bare hills of the Gobi; while here and there through an opening in the hills we could catch a glimpse of the snowy peaks above. There are, however, no trees nor even bushes, either on the hills or in the valleys…
We crossed the range at a height of eight thousand feet [2400 m]. Except the last half-mile the ascent was not steep, but led gradually up a narrow valley. The last mile or two was over soft green turf, and near the summit there was a perfect mass of flowers, chiefly forget-me-nots; and I am sure I shall not forget for a very long time the pleasure it was, seeing all this rich profusion of flowers and grass, in place of those dreary gravel slopes of the Gobi Desert.

…a curious characteristic of these hills is that there is absolutely no water. For twelve miles from Morgai to the summit of the pass we had not seen a drop of water… Five miles on the southern side a small stream appeared, and the valley bottom was partitioned off into fields, round which irrigation ducts had been led ; but these were all now deserted, and the water was wasted in flowing over uncultivated fields. Trees now began to appear near the stream, and at 11:10 p.m. we pitched camp on a little grassy plot near a stream of cold clear water, and under a small grove of trees.

(pp. 119-120)

The pass (summit elevation 2580 metres, or 8450 feet) is just twelve miles of ascent from Morgai. Five miles down on the south side, water indeed appears, in the form of irrigated fields today.

The next day is July 2nd, and the presence of “July 22” in the text is surely a misprint.

On July 22 we passed a small square-walled town called Ching-cheng, surrounded by fields of wheat and some good grass land, but when these ended the desert began again directly.

(p. 121)

Ching-cheng is easy to locate even on Google Terrain, where it shows up as Qinchengxiang. (Xiang is a Chinese word for township.)

A long way off over the desert we could see a couple of poplar trees rising out of the plain. These poplars are very common all over Chinese Turkestan, and they make excellent landmarks. We reached these at twelve at night, and found a few soldiers stationed there, who said that Hami was still a long way off. Now, as my constant inquiry for the last month had been, ” How far are we from Hami?” and as the guide for the last few days had each time said we were only sixty miles off, I was rather exasperated to find that, instead of having ten or twenty miles more to get over, there was still a good fifty.

(p. 121)

Consequently in the map above I have placed them, at the end of July 2nd at a line of poplars, fifty miles out of Hami.

Two days later it is not entirely with good grace that Younghusband reaches the end of the first leg of his journey.

So on striking camp at two the following afternoon [July 3rd], I told my men that my tent would not be pitched again till Hami was reached, so they had better prepare themselves for a good march. We travelled on all through the afternoon—a particularly hot one; then the sun set before us, and still we went on and on through the night till it rose again behind us.

We halted for a couple of hours by the roadside to ease the camels, and then set out again. At eight o’clock [July 4th] the desert ended, and we began to pass through cultivated land, and at last we saw Hami in the distance, and after traversing a tract of country covered with more ruined than inhabited houses, we reached an inn at 11 a.m., and it was with unspeakable relief that I dismounted from my camel for the last time.

(pp. 121-122)

To wrap up, let’s look now at the full route from Peking to Hami.

A solid line on this map indicates the portions of the route I’m confident about, and a dotted line indicates the parts that seem right but we can’t really be sure.

This would be a very interesting route to re-create today, although the way it crosses from China into Mongolia and back at remote places might make it politically challenging to do so.

If you’ve enjoyed this piece of research, you may want to download a KML file of various points along Younghusband’s route that I have mentioned in these posts. It contains a tour that you can play in Google Earth to “fly” along the route.

There is also a KML of the route itself. I recommend viewing these with vertical exaggeration set to “3” on the 3D View tab of Google Earth’s Options.

Published by Morgan Hite

Cartographer, writer, former wilderness instructor.

One thought on “Mapping Francis Younghusband in the Gobi Desert, 1887, Part 4: from the Ya-hu oasis to Hami.

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