Shaded relief with BlenderGIS (2019), part 3

[Back to Part 2]

Why do this?

The shaded relief images (also often called a hillshade) that GIS software produces are pretty good. Here’s one made with QGIS.

QGIS 2-up
The hillshade by itself (left), and blended with hypsometric tinting (right)

Hillshading algorithms typically take three parameters: the elevation of the sun, the azimuth (direction) of the sun, and the vertical exaggeration of the landscape. (60°, 337° and 1X, in this case.) They do some geometrical calculations to figure out the intensity of incident light on all the pieces of the landscape, and then produce a greyscale image. (They do not, typically, however, calculate actual thrown shadows.)

You can tweak the brightness and contrast in your GIS software, or stretch the histogram to your liking. This can do a lot to lighten up the darkest shadows, or to turn the hillshade into a ghostly wash that merely suggests relief without dominating everything else on the map.

Much of the time what we can get out of GIS software meets our needs for a hillshade, which, after all, is not the final map but a merely a layer of the map. (Although occasionally it is the pièce de résistance…)

But perhaps you don’t like the glossy, shiny quality of that hillshade above. You think the mountains look like they were extruded in plastic. They remind you a little too much of Google maps Terrain layer. Maybe you’d like to see actual shadows thrown by precipitous cliffs. Maybe you’d like something that looks more like it was chisled from stone, like this…

Blender 2-up

Or perhaps you are interested in…

Blender 2-up 2 suns
A second sun, shinning straight down to eliminate the darkest shadows
Blender 2-up warm and cool light
A warm (yellow) sun in the northwest, cool (blue) shadows
Blender 2-up denoised
Denoising performed on the image after rendering

This might be why you are investigating Blender.

The big settings that make a difference (besides the conventional settings of azimuth, elevation and vertical exaggeration) are…

  • material
  • multiple lights and their colours
  • amount of light bounce
  • denoising the render

Material

In animation modelling, Material is what reflects, absorbs and scatters light. Blender spends much of its time tracing light rays and deciding how the surfaces they encounter affect them.

With your plane selected, go to the Material tab icon Material tab and hit New. The default material that comes up has these Surface properties. (And this is what Blender used for your basic render.)

Principled BSDF initial properties

Principled BSDF is a sort of super-versatile material that allows you to have all of these properties (subsurface scattering, metallic look, sheen, transmission of light) that in earlier versions of Blender were assigned to specific surface types, like “Diffuse BSDF,” “Glossy BSDF” or “Subsurface scattering.”

(BSDF stands for “bidirectional scattering distribution function.”)

These various surfaces are actually shaders, which are pieces of software that render the appearance of things (and may actually run on your GPU, not your CPU). If you click on “Principled BSDF” next to the word “Surface” a list of all of the possible shaders comes up.

shader list

You can learn a lot more about shaders in the Blender manual, but Blender essentially wants to give you the tools to be able to simulate any material, from water to hair, and some of the effects you can get applying this to shaded relief are pretty weird.

8 kinds of material
The same piece of terrain rendered with different shaders. Top, left to right: Diffuse BSDF with a wave texture, Glass BSDF, Hair BSDF, Principled BSDF. Bottom, left to right: Toon BSDF, Translucent BSDF, Translucent BSDF with Principled volume emission, Velvet BSDF.

The main shader you probably want to play with is the Mix Shader, which allows you to mix the effects of two different shaders. The Mix Shader’s  factor (from 0 to 1) determines how much the results are influenced by the second shader.

Mix Diffuse Glossy
On left, the original render; on right, a Mix shader (Fac=0.2) of Diffuse BSDF (defaults) and Glossy BSDF (IOR=2). This adds just a bit of glossiness to the surface.
Mix Diffuse Toon
On left, the original render; on right, a Mix shader (Fac=0.3) of Diffuse BSDF (defaults) and Toon BSDF (defaults). This brings in bright highlights that tend to wash out flat surfaces.

The other aspect of material that is worth experimenting with is value. Blender’s default material, the Principled BSDF, has a default colour of near-white, and its value is 0.906 (on a scale of 0 to 1).

principled BSDF default base colour

By darkening this you create a more light-absorbing material.

Principled BSDF base colour 0.5 lamp 45 337 str 3 v2
On left, the original render; on right, Principled BSDF (base color value turned down to 0.5).

You might think that the effect of a darker material is just to shift the distribution of pixel values down in the render, and that you could get the same effect by turning down the brightness of the original. But if you look at the histogram of each image you see the pixel values are distributed differently, and even when both are displayed with “histogram stretch,” they are distinct from each other.

base color 0.906 versus 0.5 both histogram stretched
Left: the value of the base color of material (Principled BSDF) is 0.906 (the default). Right: the value of the base color is 0.5. Both are displayed with histogram stretch.

And of course if it works for your map you can give the material real colour. (Don’t forget to save the render as RGB rather than BW). This, however, is very similar to colorizing your shaded relief in GIS software.

sandstone yellow material

Multiple lights and their colours

To add another light to your scene, go Add>Light>Sun. You can also experiment with adding other types of lights: point lights (which shine in all directions from a specific place), spot lights (which send out a specific cone of light) and area lights.

A second light can bring out features in a very nice way.

second sun from the east
On left: vertical exaggeration 2x, one sun in the NNW, elevation 45°, angle= 10°, strength = 3. On right: the same scene plus a second sun in the east, elevation 45°, angle = 1°, strength 0.5.

By giving colour to lights, you can create differential lighting and colour.

Diffuse 2x BSDF default 45 337 str 3 color orange LAMP2 str 0.5 az east color yellow
Same scene as above, but now the sun in the NNW is orange, and the sun in the east is yellow.

There is one more light in your scene that often goes unnoticed, and this is what Bender called the world background colour. You can think of this as a very far away surface that nonetheless does contribute a bit of light to your scene—from all directions. You can see the world colour in action if you render your scene with the sun strength turned down to 0.

world background only
No lights in the scene: mysteriously there’s still something there. This is the effect of the world background colour.

If there are places in your scene that sunlight does not reach, the world background still contributes to their illumination—and colour.

By default the word background colour is 25% grey (value = 0.25), but you can change this to a dark blue if you would like dark blue light to collect in your shadows.

world background blue
World background colour set to blue (Hex 414465), strength 1. Secondary pale yellow (Hex FFE489) light in east, strength 0.5

Amount of light bounce

Part of the charm of Blender is that it calculates how much light reflects off surfaces and then hits other surfaces, which is why even shadowed areas have some light. You can control, however, the number of bounces a light ray has before it expires. This is on the Render tab icon Render tab, in the Light Paths section.

light paths default

By default, the light paths settings are as above. With the material I am using, the Max Bounces for Diffuse materials is the important part, and by default it is 4.

The presets exist icon icon to the right of “Light Paths” indicates that there are presets available. Clicking here reveals three key presets:

  • Direct Light: light gets few bounces, and none off diffuse material
  • Limited Global Illumination: light gets one bounce off diffuse material
  • Full Global Illumination: light gets 128 bounces off diffuse material

Changing among these does not make a huge difference, but in scenes with deep shadows it is visible.

light paths compared
Clockwise from top left, the presets are: Direct Light, Limited Global Illumination, Full Global Illumination, and the default settings. (With vertical exaggeration at 2x)

Denoising the render

Blender offers the post-processing feature of denoising the render. I liken this to a blanket of snow on your landscape: it erases tiny details.

denoise comparison
Left: 2x vertical exaggeration, sun in NNW, elevation 45° strength 3. Right: the same, plus denoising (Strength = 1, Feature Strength = 1)

To activate denoising, go to the View Layer tab icon View Layer tab, scroll to the very last section, Denoising, and check the Denoising box.

denoising panel

I do not find that denoising does much if you keep the default settings. I tend to turn both Strength and Feature Strength up to 1.0.

In conclusion

This is only been the tip of the iceberg. Some things I have not talked about are

  • Applying a subdivision surface modifier to your mesh so that Blender is interpolating and smoothing it on the fly.
  • BlenderGIS’s ability to read your DEM As DEM Texture, which creates a plane with subdivision and displace modifiers instead of a plane whose every vertex corresponds to a DEM cell.
  • How to focus the orthographic camera down on one small part of your DEM where you can do quick test renders while you work out lighting, material, etc.
  • The node editor for complex materials
  • Using a perspective camera to shoot a scene that is not straight down
  • Cutting DEMs into tiles for Blender to work with, when the whole DEM is simply too much for the RAM on your computer.

Have fun exploring Blender’s many features!

Shaded Relief with BlenderGIS (2019), part 2

[Back to Part 1]

In the overall process we are now at step 3, but things will go faster now.

  1. Prepare your DEM
  2. Read the DEM into Blender as DEM raw data build
  3. Adjust Z scaling (vertical exaggeration)
  4. Create and adjust a georef camera
  5. Correct the final pixel dimensions of the output image to match the DEM
  6. Set final image type to be TIFF
  7. Turn the light into a Sun, and adjust its properties
  8. Do a test render
  9. Do a full render

At the end I’ll cover some of the variations on this process and extra tweaks you can do.

Adjust Z scaling (vertical exaggeration)

The first thing to adjust on your plane is what we usually call the vertical exaggeration, but Blender thinks of as the Z scaling.

With the plane selected, go to the Object tab icon Object tab. Here you should see a number of sections, the first of which is the Transform section.

Object Transform section

Under Scale increase the Z value if you want to create vertical exaggeration. You should see your plane change shape.

It’s important to increase Z scaling before setting up the georef camera, because if you increase Z scaling afterwards, you may accidentally have set the camera below the tops of the highest features.

In my case the terrain has plenty of relief, so I’ll leave Scale Z at 1.000.

Create and adjust georef camera

Make sure the plane is still selected (in the Outliner) and go GIS>Camera>Georef.

A new camera (“Georef cam”) will appear in the Outliner. You do not need to delete the old camera.

When the georef cam is selected, then in the 3D Viewport you’ll see something like this (you may have to pull back).

georef cam createdThis is an orthographic camera (meaning, in effect, that all points of its lens look directly down: there is no perspective distortion) placed over the plane.

To check that your camera is properly pointed at your landscape, and sees all of it, hover the mouse over the 3D Viewport, and hit 0 on the numeric keypad (or go View>Viewpoint>Camera). You should see what the camera sees (“camera orthographic view”)

camera orthographic view

Hit NumPad-0 again (or go View>Viewpoint>Camera again) to go back to regular (“User perspective”) view.

Output tab: Correct the final pixel dimensions of the output image to match the DEM, and set final image type to be TIFF

Go to the Output tab icon Output tab, and under Dimensions check the Resolution X and Y that were set up when you created the georeferenced camera. Also note the percentage (%), which is 100% at this point.

output resolution

Change Resolution X and Resolution Y to match the pixel dimensions of your DEM. In my case, the initial DEM was 839 x 702 pixels, so I enter these two numbers for X and Y. With the dimensions of the hillshade matching those of the DEM I can, at the end, apply the DEM’s world file to the Blender output, and georeference it.

It’s possible at this stage in the process to set percentage to something small, like 20%. This way you can do some quick test renders: Blender will produce a rendering whose pixel dimensions are only 20% of the overall Resolution numbers you set. (Before the final render you’ll be back here and set this to 100% again.)

Lower down on the same tab, under Output, set the parameters for the type of image you want.

Output output parameters

I typically set these to File Format = TIFF, Color=BW and Color Depth = 8, but you can get JPG, PNG, etc. If you choose later to assign colour (other than grey or white) to the plane’s material, the world background or the sun, you will probably want to set Color to RGB or RGBA.

Turn the light into a Sun, and adjust its properties

Your plane is built, your camera is set: now all that is left to arrange is the Sunlight.

Select the Light in the outliner, and go to the Light object data tab icon Object Data tab.

Initially you should see something like this under Light:

Light object data Light initial

Click on Sun, and then change Strength to 1.

Click on the Use Nodes button below, and set its Strength to 2. It should now look like this.

Light object data Light final

You will want to play around with the Strength setting (in the Nodes section) when you do test renders. The strength of the light affects how bright your hillshade is.

The Angle setting for the sun is important. The Angle is how many degrees across the sun’s face looks from the ground. A sun with a smaller angle produces shadows with sharper edges.

sun angle comparison
Sun angle of 1° (left) and 10° (right)

A 1° sun is essentially a point source, and it casts sharp shadows. A 10° sun is bigger and the edges of shadows are diffuse. Take your pick.

Note that if you decide to use a coloured sun later (see “Part 3“) this is where you will change its colour: Light>Object Data>Nodes>Color.

Now go to the Object tab icon Object tab, and consider the location, rotation and scale of the light.

Light object transform initial

The location of the light does not matter: a “Sun” type light is considered to shine from an infinite distance regardless of its location. Scale should be left as all 1’s.

The rotation of the light however is all-important to us. It is here that we set the sun elevation and azimuth. These are both counter-intuitive in Blender, so here’s how it works.

Rotation X is always 0

Rotation Y is the complement of the familiar elevation angle (that is, 90 minus elevation). E.g., if you want a sun 60° above the horizon, set Rotation Y to 30°. Think of a light in a theatre clamped to a lighting pipe suspended over the stage. The pipe is the Y axis. The light is initially pointing straight down (0°) and you are swinging it up by 30°.

Rotation Z is the azimuth of the light, but instead of beginning at 0° for North and increasing clockwise (as we are familiar with from compass bearings), it begins at 0° for East and increases counterclockwise. (Think of angles measured on a coordinate plane.) It’s generally quickest to figure out by sketching on the back of an envelope, but the actual formula is that the Rotation Z = 450 – Azimuth, and subtract 360 from your answer if it is greater than 360.

common rotations Z

A few common angles: If I want a sun 50° above the horizon, coming from azimuth 337° (North-northwest), my light’s Rotation numbers will look like this:

light rotation for 50 at 337

Do a test render (F12)

There are two good ways to do this.

The first is to switch into camera view (Numpad-0) and change the viewport shading from Solid to Render. In the 3D Viewport, locate this group of icons in the upper right:

and note the group of four circles on the right end. At present, the second one, Solid viewport shading, is selected. Click on the fourth one to change to Render viewport shading. You will see Blender begin to render your scene with the camera and lights you have configured.

The other way to do a test render is to set percentage on the Output tab to something small (e.g., 10% or 20%) and and hit F12 to get a test render at a fraction of the size of the final render. A little Render window opens and after a pause you (hopefully!) get something like this.

test render basic

Either way, doing a test render often catches common mistakes, like forgetting to set up your light or camera. It also reveals how the overall image will look, and so you can adjust your light strength, azimuth and elevation to increase or decrease shadows and the overall brightness of the image.

When finished, be sure to either switch back to Solid viewport shading or set the output percentage to 100%.

Render

On the Output tab, adjust Sampling. To the right of the word “Sampling,” note this menu icon:

This icon indicates that presets exist for this setting. Clicking on it, select Final. This increases the sampling numbers for the render, which will improve image quality.

Hit F12 to render.

Note that you can interrupt a render by hitting ESC, or by closing the render window.

I get this result:

basic render

Image>Save As allows you to save the image. If I saved this as “Blender shaded relief 1x 50 337.tif” I would then make a copy of the TFW world file I created back at the beginning and name it “Blender shaded relief 1x 50 337.tfw” This makes something georeferenced that I can pull into my GIS.

That’s it! You made a hillshade in Blender!

Now, to consider the many other things we can fiddle with in Blender—material, number of lights, denoising, etc.—go to Part 3.

Shaded relief with BlenderGIS (2020), part 1

This tutorial replaces my tutorial from five years ago,  “Shaded Relief with BlenderGIS” tutorial. At this point (March 2020) I am using Blender 2.82 and the most recent BlenderGIS addon.  Daniel Huffman’s tutorial, which uses a different technique, has also been updated.

Blender 2-up denoised

It’s rather an understatement to say that Blender is complex. To keep things from getting out of hand, I’m going to take a straight path, right through the centre of the software, with a focus on getting out the other side with a completed render of shaded relief. But at the end, I will return and explore some of the interesting side trails that lead to the features that make the Blender hillshades so interesting.

Here’s the basic procedure I will follow to create a hillshade, once Blender is installed with the BlenderGIS addon. This can function as a checklist once you’ve become familiar with the process:

  1. Prepare your DEM
  2. Read the DEM into Blender as DEM raw data build
  3. Adjust Z scaling (vertical exaggeration)
  4. Create and adjust a georef camera
  5. Correct the final pixel dimensions of the output image to match the DEM
  6. Set final image type to be TIFF
  7. Turn the light into a Sun, and adjust its properties
  8. Do a test render
  9. Do a full render

Before you experiment with using Blender to make shaded relief, you will want to try the relatively simpler step of producing your own shaded relief in GIS software like QGIS. Consequently, this tutorial won’t explain a host of things that you would learn in that process: what digital elevation models (DEMs) are, the importance of cell sizes, nodata values and projections, or the art of combining shaded relief with other layers, stretching histograms and adjusting brightness and contrast. I will assume that you already know that, at its most basic level, creating shaded relief involves specifying a sun elevation and azimuth, and selecting a vertical exaggeration for your terrain.

I use the free GDAL command-line tools gdal_translate and gdalwarp to do re-projection and re-sampling, as well as produce world files. If the command line makes you queasy, QGIS offers a graphical front-end to these tools as well. (Processing>Toolbox, and search on “translate” or “warp.”)

Your first step will be to go to https://www.blender.org/ and obtained the free animation software Blender 2.8.

Installation of BlenderGIS

You only have to do this once, and then Blender is prepared to accept geographic data.

The BlenderGIS addon has installation instructions in its wiki at https://github.com/domlysz/BlenderGIS/wiki/Install-and-usage. Basically, they go as follows.

Go to the BlenderGIS site on github and hit the Clone or Download button, and then Download ZIP. You will receive a file called BlenderGIS-master.zip which you can store pretty much anywhere. Once you’ve installed BlenderGIS, you won’t need this file any more.

Within Blender,  go Edit>Preferences, and select the Addons tab. Click Install…, select the BlenderGIS-master.zip file, and click Install Add-on from File.

Once it is installed, be sure to check the box next to 3D view: BlenderGIS to enable it.

BlenderGIS installed

Note that a new menu appears in Blender: the GIS menu.

BlenderGIS menu

Two more tweaks will make Blender easier to use.

  1. Note the default cube that is always there in a new workspace. To delete it, hover the mouse over the cube and hit the Delete key.
  2. Find the Render tab on the right, and set Render Engine to Cycles. (If you have a good graphics card, you might also want to set Device to GPU compute)
setCycles

Now go File>Defaults>Save Startup File. This means that in the future, Blender will open with no cube, and with Cycles as the render engine.

Preparing your DEM

  1. Note down the dimensions of your DEM
  2. Convert (re-project) to a metric projection
  3. Create a world file

First I will note down the pixel dimensions of my DEM, whcih in this case are 839 x 702. I will use these numbers later to tell Blender what size image to produce.

Now, the most important principle of making hillshades is that your vertical and horizontal units should be the same. If the DEM data came projected in degrees, you need to convert that to a projection measured in metres.

You’ll notice later that BlenderGIS claims that it can read a DEM projected in “WGS84 latlon” —in other words, EPSG 4326. I have found this works only when you are reading that DEM into a Blender scene already georeferenced in a metric projection.  You have to do a kind of complicated head-stand to make this occur, so we’ll take the simpler route and feed to BlenderGIS a DEM that is projected in metres. Typically for me (in northern British Columbia) this would be UTM Zone 9 North/WGS84 (EPSG 32609) or the BC Albers Equal-Area projection/WGS84 (EPSG 3005).

I will use gdalwarp to re-project, and (optionally) re-sample. In the following example, I am re-projecting out of  lat/long/WGS84 (EPSG code 4326) into UTM Zone 9 north/WGS84 (EPSG code 32609), and re-sampling to 16 metre square cells. I will assume your DEM is a geotiff file.

gdalwarp  -s_srs EPSG:4326 -t_srs EPSG:32609 -r bilinear -tr 16 16 -of GTiff -co "TFW=YES" myDEM.tif myDEM_32609_16x16.tif

Where

-s_srs
the Spatial Reference System (projection & datum) of the original (the “source”)
-t_srs
the SRS of the result (the “target”)
-r
resampling method (bilinear, cubic, etc.)
-tr
resolution, in metres (give two values, one for X and one for Y)
-of
output format
-co
additional creation options (TFW=YES means create a world file)

The terms “projection/datum,” SRS (Spatial Reference System), and CRS (Coordinate Reference System) are interchangeable for our purposes.

[I’m not going to suggest converting your DEM to Float32 data type. This makes a difference only with large scale mapping (e.g., 1:25.000 or larger), where you might actually see “steps” in your hillshade where the elevations change by whole metres. If you are doing such mapping, consider floating your DEM first.]

Finally, you will want a world file for the DEM, so you can georeference the hillshade Blender produces. World files used to be pretty common, but now that raster data so often comes with its georeferencing built in, I will explain what they are.

The world file was a clever invention: a six-line text file that contained the cell dimensions and the coordinates of the image origin (upper left corner). It was paired with the image file by having the exact same filename, but with a TFW extension (for TIFF images). For example, you could have myDEM.tif and its associated world file myDEM.tfw. This allowed the georeferencing information to be held externally to the image file.

world file

When an image file has no georeferencing (i.e., it is an ordinary TIFF image, not a GeoTiff), the world file is all your GIS software needs to correctly place and scale the image. The only additional piece that it will have to ask you for is the projection of the image, in order to make sense of the world file.

For JPG and PNG images, the world file extensions are JGW and PNW, respectively.

To make a world file I use gdal_translate as follows:

gdal_translate -co "TFW=YES" myDEM.tif deleteme.tif

This copies myDEM.tif to a dummy file called deleteme.tif (which I will immediately delete), and in the process makes a world file called deleteme.tfw. For now I’ll rename this to myDEM.tfw. Later I’ll change its name again to match the image created by Blender.

So at the end of this preparation step I have three things:

  • a DEM in a metric projection (e.g., myDEM_32609_16x16.tif)
  • a corresponding world file (e.g., myDEM_32609_16x16.tfw)
  • I know the EPSG projection code for the projection the DEM is in (e.g., 32609)

Read the DEM into Blender as Raw DEM

On the GIS menu, go Import>Georeferenced raster, and navigate to your DEM file.

In the right margin, set Mode to DEM raw data build (slow). (If you do not check the Build faces box, you will get a point cloud.)

importGeoraster options

You also have the option here of selecting the correct CRS (coordinate reference system) for your DEM. You need to do this only if you plan on bringing other georeferenced data into Blender to lay atop your DEM. If not, you can leave this at the default value (WGS84 latlon) even though that is incorrect.

[If the CRS you want to use is not on the dropdown menu, you can add it by clicking the “+” button, checking the Search box, typing in the EPSG code for your CRS into the Query box, and hitting Enter. It should appear in the Results box, and then you just check Save to addon preferences and click OK.]

addingANewCRS

After a pause, during which Blender builds a plane mesh out of your DEM, you will see a grey, 3D rendering of your terrain, floating in a coordinate space.

initial screen

A quick tour of Blender

Let’s take a brief detour here and learn some of the the language of Blender, as well as some of its controls and unexpected behaviours.

Blender, being 3D animation software, is a world of vertices (points in space), edges (which connect vertices) and faces (which fill in between edges). In this case, the cells of the DEM have been translated into a square array of vertices, each with the appropriate height for the DEM cell it represents. These vertices have been connected with edges that form a square lattice like the cells of the DEM. Each square of four edges has a face.

The whole set of vertices, etc. is a mesh, specifically in this case a plane mesh.

In the lower right  corner, you will notice a status bar:

initial stats

This tells us that we have 588,978 vertices and 587,438 faces. My DEM is 839 columns by 702 rows, and 839 x 702 = 588,978, so I could have predicted the number of vertices. This is useful to know so you can estimate before reading in a DEM, how much RAM it will require. On average (and this varies as the size of the DEM increases), every 3,500,000 vertices requires 1GB of RAM.

The number of faces is slightly less because no faces are generated by the final row and final column (839 + 702 = 1541, minus 1 face which would be generated by both the final row and final column, hence 1540 fewer faces than vertices.)

The status bar also tells us we are presently using 291MB of RAM. This will go up during the final render. Near as I can tell, available RAM is the only limit to the size of DEMs that Blender can handle.

You can see the vertices, edges and faces of your plane mesh if you zoom in and press TAB to toggle into Edit mode.

initial mesh in edit mode

Don’t worry if you can’t figure out how to do this just yet. If you do though, be sure to press TAB again to leave Edit mode before continuing on.

The upper right corner of Blender has a panel called an outliner that shows a tree of objects in the Blender world. At present it looks like this.

outliner

Notice that the plane (called “Thomlinson 32609 16m clip” in my case) is selected. (In the 3D view this is reflected by the fact that the plane is outlined in orange.) In addition there is a camera and a light.

Below the outliner is a Properties panel. On its left margin you will see a series of tabs identified by these icons. Hovering over them reveals their names.

Blender tab selector

We won’t have anything to do with some of these (Particles, Physics, etc.) The important ones for our purposes are Render, Output, Object and Object Data.

Note: sometimes the collection of tabs changes, depending on what object in the Blender world is selected. At this moment the plane is selected, but if the light were selected some of these tabs would disappear, and the Object Data tab would display a Light object data tab icon green light bulb icon.

The rest of the screen is taken up by the large 3D Viewport panel. Navigating in this is similar to using Google Earth, but a little different.

  • Rolling the mouse wheel zooms you in and out.
  • Holding down the mouse wheel button while moving the mouse in this panel allows you to rotate around objects.
  • To pan, hold down Shift and the mouse wheel button while moving the mouse to either side.

The other thing to know about Blender is that some keys work only when the cursor is over the 3D Viewport.

  • n toggles the 3D View Properties Panel
  • Numpad -. (period) centres the view on the selected object.
  • Numpad-0 toggles between this view and camera view.
  • TAB toggles the selected mesh in and out of Edit mode (and we won’t be using this).

Remember that Blender is a studio for animators. It is designed to allow you to sculpt new objects, and the generate many frames of animation in which various objects are lit by lights and shot from a specific camera. We are not going to create any new objects, and are going to shoot only a single frame; so there are many controls we will not use.

However, setting up our light and camera are crucial, and that’s what we do in Part 2.